Minutes (4) | tstarkey1212

Here’s another leaked document from my contact who is certainly not me. This time it’s on behaviour policy. As a rule, my policy is that everyone has to behave, apart from me. Subscribe to http://ift.tt/1zprWLU or I’ll not be pleased and no-one wants that. 

New Behaviour Policy Meeting

Present: DR, PT, AA

Apologies from: The entire senior leadership team

Meeting held in: DR’s room, as he has biscuits

ITEM 1: Rationale behind updating the behaviour policy

The old one is 87 pages long and seems specifically designed to be so complicated that by the time anyone follows…

Continue reading at:
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Wrong, But Useful: Episode 48 | Colin

In this month’s episode of Wrong, But Useful, Colin and Dave are joined by @niveknosdunk, who is Professor Kevin Knudson in real life.
Kevin, along with previous Special Guest Co-Host @evelynjlamb, has recently launched a podcast, My Favorite Theorem
The number of the podcast is 12; Kevin introduces us to sublime numbers, highly composite numbers, and several other fascinating dozen-related facts.
We rant about the whole 6÷2(1+2) thing hashtag fakemaths, and try to rescue it with a thread on the obelus. @divbyzero also has a post about the whole thing.
“Obvious” things.
Broken patterns:…

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Minutes (4) | tstarkey1212

Here’s another leaked document from my contact who is certainly not me. This time it’s on behaviour policy. As a rule, my policy is that everyone has to behave, apart from me. Subscribe to http://ift.tt/1zprWLU or I’ll not be pleased and no-one wants that. 

New Behaviour Policy Meeting

Present: DR, PT, AA

Apologies from: The entire senior leadership team

Meeting held in: DR’s room, as he has biscuits

ITEM 1: Rationale behind updating the behaviour policy

The old one is 87 pages long and seems specifically designed to be so complicated that by the time anyone follows…

Continue reading at:
http://ift.tt/2wtCDIi

The Paradox of the Second Ace | Colin

This post is inspired by a Futility Closet article. Do visit them and subscribe to their excellent podcast!

Suppose you’re dealt a bridge hand1, and someone asks whether you have any aces; you check, and yes! you find an ace. What’s the probability you have more than one ace?

This is a slightly messy combinatorics problem, but one that can be solved with a bit of elbow-grease.
Dud man’s hand again

The probability of getting no aces is simple: there are 48 non-aces in the pack, so it’s $\frac{48}{52} \times \frac{47}{51} \times \frac{46}{50} \times … \times \frac{36}{40}$, or…

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Feedback and what good ‘looks like’ | FurtherEdagogy

I’ve been thinking a lot about feedback lately and reminiscing on my younger days as a sports coach. When introducing a new skill to an individual, it was imperative that I could model, or show an example of what good looks like, otherwise learners would simply not know what they were aiming to achieve.

 

Learning something new is really challenging, it becomes more so if we don’t know what good ‘looks like’. I’m not an engineer, but let’s take the example of learning a fillet lap weld. Without seeing what a good fillet lap weld looks like, it would be nigh on impossible for a learner to…

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Advice | tstarkey1212

 

Here’s another one for http://ift.tt/1zprWLU who promise to move me off the back page if I promise to stop stealing the individual sugar packets that they have next to their coffee machine. 

So I’m never getting off the back page. Subscribe by hitting the link. 

So the holidays are here (or just about over, or actually over, depending on when you are reading this – writing for magazines is a bit like being a Time Lord sometimes, only no one cares what gender you are); the old academic year is over and another is soon to begin. With the new crop of students comes a fresh crop…

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Are Any of Us Where We Set Out to Be? | charliecountryboy

Do you find it amusing that some of us end our working lives in a completely different career to the one we originally chose? I’m not sure if I ever really wanted to be a teacher. From the age of about four I often played at being a tradesman, usually a different one every day. Each morning my mum had a four-year-old electrician, plumber or carpenter knocking on the door. As I recall she would then supply me with a household fault and tools accordingly. I must have been very good because I never had a call back or a complaint. During this very busy period I pursued other avenues in my spare…

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